Iris, o Iris…and crocuses, and grass

Iris, o Iris…and crocuses, and grass

I have two questions about irises. One of my friends recently told me that if I go out in September and cut the leaves off about an inch or two above the ground, they would bloom better the next year. I have never heard of this, and know that with a lot of bulbs if you cut their leaves off before they die back naturally, you'll kill the plant or reduce it's bloom. Anyone know if what my friend says makes any difference? I noticed that an elderly man down the street from me does this to his irises, and he always has nice bloom...but I also notice nice bloom on irises that haven't been cut down. Since irises are fairly hardy rhizomes I'm wondering if it makes any difference at all. Secondly, I need to find where I can store iris rhizomes overwinter. My husband TRIED to follow my directions as he slung mad quantities of dirt all over my pretty walkway. We are converting our garage into a hospice-ready apartment for our disabled friend, and it has to be done in a hurry, so he started the trenching without me being prepared. I had planned on moving all the irises to a permanent location somewhere else, and putting the fescue sod down in my kitchen garden to move it back in the spring. But he just picked up a few hunks of the grass and dug up a few irises and THREW them into the garden. They're laying there now, looking sad and brutalised. Will my fescue ever recover from this? Will the fescue buried under a ton of dirt survive being that way for a month? Will my crocuses croak? I'm just about in dispair: that courtyard was the one part of my grounds I felt was solidly landscaped and beautiful, with only years of constant spreading and bloom to look forward to. Thanks!
Maximize Room On A Bookshelf.

Maximize Room On A Bookshelf.

Garden Piccies!

Garden Piccies!

Just a load of photos from my garden this morning

Just a load of photos from my garden this morning

Live Music!

Live Music!

Plant ID

Plant ID

Hello hello♥

Hello hello♥