Shade-loving, slug-resistant foundation plantings

Shade-loving, slug-resistant foundation plantings

Greetings!

The north side of my house is in perpetual shade. It has shrubs and some naturalized daylilies from the front porch back to the dining room window (which "bumps out," accommodating a window seat), but under that window seat-window bump-out there's only bare, dry soil (irrigating or even regular watering under there wouldn't be a problem.) From there to the back edge of the house, grass grows right up to the foundation.

Apparently the earlier owners were keeping the landscaping in character with the house's character for the year in which it was built (1916) when "foundation plantings" weren't used. I'm actually okay with that, but a mowing border would make life easier.

And my neighbor's kitties avail themselves of the loose, dry soil under the dining room bump-out, so I thought that to kill two (or three) birds with one stone, I'd plant something shade-loving along the foundation (and maybe install a "mowing border" of pavers, or something like that.) Ideally, that would discourage the cats, give me a mowing border and although it would not be "in character," I'm wililng to forgive myself for that.

Originally I'd been thinking, "Ferns," but now I'm thinking, "Hostas." I expect that if I plant hostas, even slug-resistant ones, I'll also be setting slug traps (beer dishes.)

So, please chime in.

If you're in Zone 5b, 5a, 5 or colder, what are your favorite *slug resistant* hostas? Which cultivars have given you the best results in shade, resisting slugs? "Slug resistant" and "Shade-loving" are paramount.

Thanks!

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