Another Job Resource (USA and Canada)

Another Job Resource (USA and Canada)

If you are at all interested in construction/skilled trades, look into joining a union. They don't usually advertise, put classified ads in, anything like that, so without someone giving you info or doing a little research, you're not getting a job that other people are. In fact I honestly think the real reason why everyone there knows each other is not so much that they are pulling strings to get people in, but simply telling them where to go, and when. (There are ways to pull strings but it isnt as easy as you may think -- but you never know.) Anyways, I'll give some basic pointers and info and if you need more I can try to point you in the right direction. Some places, a union construction job is amazing, others, not so good. Also, it is usually an apprentice period of a few years, where you make no less than half the prevailing wage when you start, and by time you are a journeyman you are making full wages. Some have high prevailing wages though so the half isn't so bad and of course it is above minimum wage. Also when you are a journeyman your certification is usually transferable, you can 'boom' which means you go from city to city and work, you just call the local in the city you want to work in and say you are a journeyman, you're looking for work. Some even have hotlines to call telling where in the USA there is work. Now, some locals have an open enrollment. You go down, fill out an application and you go in the next class. Some only give out applications once a year or whever they have openings, and in one case in NYC, people camped out from the Thursday before when applications were given out on a Monday morning. How do you FIND a local? There are a couple of ways: Google (your city name) union local and you will get both web pages and phone numbers/addresses of locals in your city (nearest big city). You'll see things like Ironworker, electrician, steamfitter, plumber, etc. Call whatever you like, call them all. Ask how to apply. See if your state Dept of Labor website has a section on apprentices. I know NY and NJ do. Go to this page and find your county. Click on one of the links in your county (usually under HEAVY). You will see charts of the different unions, and their current wages and benefits. On the chart you will see something like IRON 0046 which means Ironworker local 46. Or you will see ELEC 0003 which is Electricians, local 3. Call information or google looking for that local. If you can't decipher the chart, comment and I will try to help. Also, if there is a trade you want, try looking for the international's website. Like the IBEW (those are electricians) have their own site. The site SHOULD have contact info on it for your area. Oh, and many of the internationals have a presence in Canada. Often these locals act like temp agencies, they have hiring halls, and once you are in, you go and 'shape' which is go to the hall in the morning and they put you on an available job. Some jobs last a day, some months, some years. Sometimes when they put you on a job the company likes you and then puts you on another job when done. If not, you just go to the hall and start again. And this also satisfies unemployment requirements if there is no work -- as long as you go to the hall you are doing what it takes to work, you have some flexibility when you are in a skilled trade like that. I hope this helps and I hope it made sense, and if you want more info/clarification on something, do comment or drop me a line and I will see what I can do to help. I just posted it in here because lately people have been asking 'how do I get a job like your husband has' (I think they are interested in why he is home by 3pm!) and found out that people don't know how to apply.
BEFORE AND AFTER

BEFORE AND AFTER

Complete mystery…

Complete mystery…

Yuck!!!

Yuck!!!

Thrips, pesticide and veggie contamination

Thrips, pesticide and veggie contamination

Help!

Help!

Holly’s Room

Holly’s Room