One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal

One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal

This is a really great article in the NYTimes from last week about how much food Americans tend to waste on any given day. It's equivalent to one pound of food per person every day. I've been making menu plans and the boy and I have been wasting a lot less food than before. For the last couple of weeks, I've been averaging about $50/week for both of us for fresh vegetables and fruit, meat, staples, etc which include me stocking the pantry at times too. This also includes enough food for tons of leftovers. We made potato leek soup a couple weeks ago from a 5lb bag of potatoes and 3 leeks. Total recipe cost was $3 and we got about 10 servings from it for only 30¢/serving. Below is an excerpt from the article. Read the full article here along with graphics: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/18/weekinreview/18martin.html May 18, 2008 The World One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal By ANDREW MARTIN Grocery bills are rising through the roof. Food banks are running short of donations. And food shortages are causing sporadic riots in poor countries through the world. You’d never know it if you saw what was ending up in your landfill. As it turns out, Americans waste an astounding amount of food — an estimated 27 percent of the food available for consumption, according to a government study — and it happens at the supermarket, in restaurants and cafeterias and in your very own kitchen. It works out to about a pound of food every day for every American. Grocery stores discard products because of spoilage or minor cosmetic blemishes. Restaurants throw away what they don’t use. And consumers toss out everything from bananas that have turned brown to last week’s Chinese leftovers. In 1997, in one of the few studies of food waste, the Department of Agriculture estimated that two years before, 96.4 billion pounds of the 356 billion pounds of edible food in the United States was never eaten. Fresh produce, milk, grain products and sweeteners made up two-thirds of the waste. An update is under way. The study didn’t account for the explosion of ready-to-eat foods now available at supermarkets, from rotisserie chickens to sandwiches and soups. What do you think happens to that potato salad and meatloaf at the end of the day?
Curtains!

Curtains!

A couple of questions

A couple of questions

My 3 African Violets

My 3 African Violets

Darlingtonia!

Darlingtonia!

Garden candy…

Garden candy…

Merry Christmas, Mom.

Merry Christmas, Mom.